CAPTAIN TERRANCE RAYNOR - Mount Vernon Police Department

Captain Terrance Raynor was sworn in as a police officer with the Mount Vernon Police Department in September of 1984. His first assignment was patrolling Mount Vernon’s shopping dis­trict. In 1985, he was transferred to a uniformed task force where he addressed quality of life issues along the city’s Third Street corridor. In 1 986, he left the Task Force and was assigned to the department’s Motorcycle Unit where he worked for approximately eight years. In April of 1994, Terrance was promoted to the rank of Sergeant and worked as a supervisor in the Patrol Division. In 1995, he was transferred to the Community Affairs Division where he super­vised the “Police and Community Empowerment Unit” and the “Quality Of Life Task Force”. Terrance worked in Community Affairs until he was transferred to the Detective Division’s Narcotics Unit in April of 1997. In December of 1997, Terrance was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant and served as a Squad Commander in the Patrol Division. The following year he was designated Executive Officer of the Patrol Division.
Terrance worked in that capacity until March of 2000, when he was pro­moted to the rank of Captain and assigned as the Commanding Officer of the Special Operations Division. During his career, Terrance received several department citations, numerous certifi­cates of merit and a Commissioner’s Unit Citation. He has received law enforcement training from The New York Police Department and the Drug Enforcement Agency. Terrance is also a graduate of the Federal Bureau Of Investigation’s 201 st National Academy. He is a Mount Vernon resident, a member of the Westchester-Rockland Guardians Association and a member of Progressive Lodge #64, free and accepted masons.



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